A Very Cellular Song - The Incredible String Band


Rola: A Very Cellular Song
Traducción: Una canción muy celular
Intérprete: The Incredible String Band
Compositor: Mike Heron
Disco: The Hangman's Beautiful Daughter
Productor: Joe Boyd

HISTORIA

When people talk of this record, they are usually talking the 13-minute opus "A Very Cellular Song" which can be easily seen as the inspiration of the rock student theatre of The Who and the Kinks and Lou Reed. The way it lilts between motifs is ingenious. Harpsichords and handclaps and hornpipes and kazoos co-mingle in festive abandon, encompassing the run of human emotion from revelry to despair within its walls. Such is the schizoid way of The Incredible String band, but there is no greater example of it than in "A Very Cellular Song." The Hangman's Beautiful daughter is both an exhilarating and exhausting listen. You welcome the calliope and water sounds interplay of "The Water Song" after the encyclopedic psychedelia before it. By the time "Swift as the Wind" hits toward the end, you are as spent and howling as the singer is against the rising breeze of the guitars.


DATOS DE LA GRABACIÓN

Duración: 13:09
Año: 1968
Formato: L.P.
A la venta: 01/03/1968
Disquera: Elektra


MÚSICOS

Robin Williamson - vocals, guitar, gimbri, penny whistle, percussion, pan pipe, piano, oud, mandolin, Jew's harp, chahanai, water harp, harmonica
Mike Heron - vocals, sitar, Hammond organ, guitar, hammered dulcimer, harpsichord
Dolly Collins - flute organ, piano
David Snell - harp
Licorice McKechnie - vocals, finger cymbals


ESCUCHA A VERY CELLULAR SONG



LETRA

A Very Cellular Song
Una canción muy celular
Winter was cold and the clothing was thin
But the gentle shepherd calls the tune
Oh dear mother what shall I do
First please your eyes and then your ears Jenny
Exchanging love tokens say goodnight

Lay down my dear sister
Won't you lay and take your rest
Won't you lay your head upon your saviours breast
And I love you but Jesus loves you the best
And I bid you goodnight, goodnight, goodnight,
And I bid you goodnight, goodnight, goodnight.
One of these mornings bright and early and fine.

Goodnight, goodnight
Not a cricket not a spirit going to shout me on
Goodnight, goodnight
I go walking in the valley of the shadow of death
Goodnight, goodnight
And his rod and his staff shall comfort me
Goodnight, goodnight
Oh John the wine he saw the sign
Goodnight, goodnight
Oh John say I seen a number of signs
Goodnight, goodnight
Tell A for the ark that wonderful boat
Goodnight, goodnight
You know they built it on the land getting water to float
Goodnight, goodnight
Tell B for the beast at the ending of the wood
Goodnight, goodnight
You know it ate all the children when they wouldn't be good
Goodnight, goodnight
I remember quite well, I remember quite well
Goodnight, goodnight
I was walking in Jerusalem just like John
Goodnight, goodnight, goodnight.

Who would lose and who would bruise
Or who would live quite prettily?
And who would love what comes along
And fill the air with joyous song

Who would go and who would come
Or who would simply linger
And who would hide behind your chair
And steal your crystallised ginger

Nebulous nearnesses cry to me
At this timeless moment
Someone dear to me wants me near, makes me high
I can hear vibrations fly
Through mangoes, pomegranates and planes
All the same
When it reaches me and teaches me
To sigh

Who would mouse and who would lion
Or who would be the tamer
And who would hear directions clear
From the unnameable namer

Who would skip and who would plod
Or who would lie quite stilly
And who would ride backwards on a giraffe
Stopping every so often to laugh

Amoebas are very small

Oh ah ee oo there's absolutely no strife
living the timeless life
I don't need a wife
living the timeless life
If I need a friend I just give a wriggle
Split right down the middle
And when I look there's two of me
Both as handsome as can be
Oh here we go slithering, here we go slithering and squelching on
Oh here we go slithering, here we go slithering and squelching on
Oh ah ee oo there's absolutely no strife
living the timeless life

Black hair brown hair feather and scale
Seed and stamen and all unnamed lives that live
Turn your quivering nerves in my direction
Turn your quivering nerves in my direction
Feel the energy projection of my cells
Wishes you well.

May the long time sun shine upon you
All love surround you
And the pure light within you
Guide you all the way on.



A VERY CELLULAR SONG VIENE EN EL L.P. THE HANGMAN'S BEAUTIFUL DAUGHTER

VERSIÓN INGLESA

LADO A
1. "Koeeoaddi There"
2. "The Minotaur's Song"
3. "Witches Hat"
4. "A Very Cellular Song"





LADO B
1. "Mercy I Cry City"
2. "Waltz of the New Moon"
3. "The Water Song"
4. "Three Is a Green Crown"
5. "Swift as the Wind"
6. "Nightfall"










The Hangman's Beautiful Daughter was the third album by The Incredible String Band, released in March 1968. It is regarded by many critics[who?] as a quintessential example of hippie culture, with its promotion of ideas such as communal living, eastern mysticism and rationalistic pantheism.

The album was a major commercial success in the UK, staying in the charts for 27 weeks with a peak of #5. It has sold 800,000 copies in the UK to date.[citation needed] In the U.S., the ISB always remained underground and the album struggled to #161 on the Billboard 200. However, it was nominated for a Grammy in the folk music category.

The album featured a series of vividly dreamlike Robin Williamson songs, such as "The Minotaur's Song", a surreal music-hall parody told from the point of view of the mythical beast, and its centrepiece was Mike Heron's "A Very Cellular Song", a 13-minute reflection on life, love and amoebas; its complex structure incorporated a Bahamian spiritual ("I Bid You Goodnight", originally recorded by the Pinder Family) and an adaptation of a Sikh hymn ("May the pure light within you"). It had a layered production, using multi-track recording techniques and a very wide array of instruments from all corners of the world, including sitar, gimbri, shenai, oud, harpsichord, panpipes and kazoo.

The album's cover art - which on original LP issues was the back cover, as the front showed just Williamson and Heron - consists of a photograph taken on Christmas Day 1967. It shows both musicians, their girlfriends Licorice McKechnie and Rose Simpson, friends Roger Marshall and Nicky Walton, several children of their friend Mary Stewart, and Robin's dog Leaf.

Regarding the title, Mike Heron said at the time:- "The hangman is death and the beautiful daughter is what comes after. Or you might say that the hangman is the past twenty years of our life and the beautiful daughter is now, what we are able to do after all these years. Or you can make up your own meaning - your interpretation is probably just as good as ours."

INTÉRPRETE

The Incredible String Band: Glasgow

The Incredible String Band (sometimes abbreviated as ISB) were a psychedelic folk band formed in Scotland in 1966.[1] The band built a considerable following, especially within British counterculture, before splitting up in 1974. The group's members are musical pioneers in psych folk and, by integrating a wide variety of traditional music forms and instruments, in the development of world music. The group reformed in 1999 and continued to perform until 2006.

In 1963, acoustic musicians Robin Williamson and Clive Palmer began performing together as a traditional folk duo in Edinburgh, particularly at a weekly club run by Archie Fisher in the Crown Bar which also regularly featured Bert Jansch. There they were seen in August 1965 by Joe Boyd, then working as a talent scout for the influential folk-based label Elektra Records. Later in the year, the duo decided to fill out their sound by adding a third member, initially to play rhythm guitar.[2] After an audition, local rock musician Mike Heron won the slot. The trio took the name "The Incredible String Band". Early in 1966 Palmer began running an all-night folk club, Clive's Incredible Folk Club, on the fourth floor of a building in Sauchiehall Street in Glasgow, where they became the house band.[3] When Boyd returned in his new role as head of Elektra's London office, he signed them up for an album, beating off a rival bid from Transatlantic Records.

They recorded their first album, titled The Incredible String Band, at the Sound Techniques studio in London in May 1966. It was released in Britain and the United States and consisted mostly of self-penned material in solo, duo and trio formats, showcasing their playing on a variety of instruments. It won the title of "Folk Album of the Year" in Melody Maker's annual poll, and in a 1968 Sing Out! Magazine interview Bob Dylan praised the album's "October Song" as one of his favourite songs of that period.

The trio broke up after recording the album. Palmer left via the hippie trail for Afghanistan and India, and Williamson and his girlfriend Licorice McKechnie went to Morocco with no firm plans to return. Heron stayed in Edinburgh, playing with a band called Rock Bottom and the Deadbeats. However, when Williamson returned after running out of money, laden with Moroccan instruments including a gimbri which was much later eaten by rats, he and Heron reformed the band as a duo.

In November 1966 Heron and Williamson embarked on a short UK tour, supporting Tom Paxton and Judy Collins.[5] In early 1967, they performed regularly at London clubs, including Les Cousins. Joe Boyd became the group's manager as well as producer, and secured a place for them at the Newport Folk Festival, on a bill with Joni Mitchell and Leonard Cohen.

The duo were always credited as separate writers, maintaining their individual creative identities, rather than working as a writing partnership. Boyd wrote: "Mike and Robin were Clive's friends rather than each other's. Without him as a buffer, they developed a robust dislike for one another. Fortunately, the quality and quantity of their songwriting was roughly equal. Neither would agree to the inclusion of a new song by the other unless he could impose himself on it by arranging the instruments and working out all the harmonies."

In July, they released their second album, The 5000 Spirits or the Layers of the Onion, accompanied by Pentangle's Danny Thompson on double bass and Licorice on vocals and percussion. The album demonstrated considerable musical development and a more unified ISB sound. It displayed their abilities as multi-instrumentalists and singer-songwriters, and gained them much wider acclaim. The album included Heron's "The Hedgehog's Song", Williamson's "First Girl I Loved" (later recorded by Judy Collins, Jackson Browne, Don Partridge and Wizz Jones) and his "The Mad Hatter's Song", which, with its mixture of musical styles, paved the way for the band's more extended forays into psychedelia. Enthusiastic reviews in the music press were accompanied by appearances at venues such as London's UFO Club (co-owned by Boyd), the Speakeasy Club, and Queen Elizabeth Hall. Their exposure on John Peel's Perfumed Garden radio show on the pirate ship Radio London, and later on BBC's Top Gear, made them favourites with the emerging UK underground audience. The album went to Number One in the UK folk chart, and was named by Paul McCartney as one of his favourite records of that year.

1968 was the band's annus mirabilis with the release of their two most-celebrated albums, The Hangman's Beautiful Daughter and the double LP Wee Tam and the Big Huge (issued as two separate albums in the US). Hangman's reached the top 5 in the UK album charts soon after its release in March 1968 and was nominated for a Grammy in the US. Robert Plant of Led Zeppelin said his group found their way by playing Hangman's and following the instructions. A departure from the band's previous albums, the set relied heavily on a more layered production, with imaginative use of the then new multi-track recording techniques.[4] The album featured a series of vividly dreamlike Williamson songs, such as "The Minotaur's Song", a surreal music-hall parody told from the point of view of the mythical beast, and its centrepiece was Heron's "A Very Cellular Song", a 13-minute reflection on life, love and amoebas; its complex structure incorporated a Bahamian spiritual ("I Bid You Goodnight") and an adaptation of a Sikh hymn (by "may the pure light within you"). Williamson and Heron in this album had added their girlfriends, Licorice McKechnie and Rose Simpson to the band to contribute additional vocals and a variety of instruments, including organ, guitar and percussion. Despite their initially rudimentary skills, Simpson swiftly became a proficient bass guitarist, and some of McKechnie's songs were recorded by the band.

By early 1968 the group were capable of filling major venues in the UK. They left behind their folk club origins and embarked on a nationwide tour incorporating a critically acclaimed appearance at the London Royal Festival Hall. Later in the year they performed at the Royal Albert Hall, at open-air festivals, and at prestigious rock venues such as the Fillmore auditoriums in San Francisco and New York. After their appearance at the Fillmore East in New York they were introduced to the practice of Scientology by David Simons (aka "Rex Rakish", once of Jim Kweskin's Jug Band). Joe Boyd, in his book White Bicycles – Making Music in the 1960s and elsewhere,[7] describes how he was inadvertently responsible for their "conversion" when he introduced the band to Simons who, having become a Scientologist, persuaded them to enrol in his absence. The band's support for Scientology over the next few years was controversial among some fans, and seemed to coincide with what many saw as the beginning of a decline in the quality of their work.[citation needed] In an interview with Oz magazine in 1969 the band spoke enthusiastically of their involvement with it, although the question of its effect on their later albums has provoked much discussion ever since.

Their November 1968 album Wee Tam and The Big Huge recorded before the US trip, was musically less experimental and lush than Hangman's but conceptually even more avant-garde, a full-on engagement with the themes of mythology, religion, awareness and identity. Williamson's otherworldly songs and vision dominate the album, though Heron's more grounded tracks are also among his very best, and the contrast between the two perspectives gives the record its uniquely dynamic interplay between a sensual experience of life and a quest for metaphysical meaning. The record was released as a double album and also simultaneously as two separate LPs, a strategy which lessened its impact on the charts.

San Francisco Girls (Return of the Native) - Fever Tree


Rola: San Francisco Girls (Return of the Native)
Traducción: Chicas de San Francisco (El regreso del nativo)
Intérprete: Fever Tree
Compositor: Scott Holtzman, Vivian Holtzman
Disco: Fever Tree
Productor: Scott Holtzman, Vivian Holtzman

HISTORIA

most famous for their single "San Francisco Girls," with its dramatic melody, utopian lyrics, and searing fuzz guitar.

DATOS DE LA GRABACIÓN

Duración: 04:01
Año: 1968
Formato: 7"
A la venta: 01/11/1968
Disquera: UNI Records


MÚSICOS

Dennis Keller - voz
Michael Stephen Knust - guitarra
Rob Landes - sintetizador, órgano y piano
E.E. "Bud" Wolfe - bajo
John Tuttle - batería


POPULARIDAD POR VENTAS (BILLBOARD - HIT PARADE)

En las listas semanales de popularidad y ventas de la revista Billboard San Francisco Girls (Return of the Native) llegó al número 91


ESCUCHA SAN FRANCISCO GIRLS (RETURN OF THE NATIVE)



LETRA

San Francisco Girls (Return of the Native)
Chicas de San Francisco (El regreso del nativo)
Out there it's summertime
Milk and honey days
Oh, San Francisco girls with
San Francisco ways

Don't try to stop me girl, you can't have your way
Don't try to stop me girl, nothin' you can say
Live like you wanna live and stay where you wanna stay
I just gotta go and get back to the Bay

So you love me girl, you're just in my way
Don't try to stop me girl, I'm movin' out today
Do what you wanna do and play what you wanna play
I just gotta go and get back to the Bay



SAN FRANCISCO GIRLS (RETURN OF THE NATIVE) VIENE EN EL L.P. FEVER TREE


LADO A
1. "Imitation Situation 1/Where do you go?"
2. "San Francisco Girls (Return To Native)"
3. "Ninety-nine And One Half"
4. "Man Who Paints The Pictures"
5. "Filigree & Shadow"


LADO B
1. "The Sun Also Rising"
2. "Day Tripper/We Can Work It Out"
3. "Nowadays Clancy Can't Even Sing"
4. "Unlock My Door"
5. "Come With Me (Rainsong)"



INTÉRPRETE

Fever Tree: Houston

The band hailed from Houston, Texas and started in 1966 as folk rock outfit, The Bostwick Vines. They changed their name to Fever Tree a year later after the addition of keyboard player Rob Landes.

Their fifteen minutes of fame arrived when their song "San Francisco Girls (Return of the Native)" reached #91 in the U.S. charts, sometime in late 1968. Like most of the band's material, it was written by the couple of Scott and Vivian Holtzman, who also were their producers. This four-minute track captured all the band's trademarks: Dennis Keller's incantation-like vocals, the quick shifting between slow parts with an almost sacral feeling and faster, more rock-oriented parts, and especially the searing guitar work by Michael Knust.

Fever Tree also released their self-titled debut album, Fever Tree, in 1968, which charted at #156. A second album, Another Time, Another Place, followed in 1969. Apart from "San Francisco Girls", they never had another hit, although they later also tried writing songs themselves when they had dropped the Holtzmans as producers.

The Bird Has Flown - Deep Purple


Rola: The Bird Has Flown
Traducción: El pájaro ha volado
En México: El vuelo del pájaro
Intérprete: Deep Purple
Compositor: Rod Evans, Ritchie Blackmore, John Lord
Disco: Deep Purple III
Productor: Derek Lawrence

HISTORIA

A different recording from the version released on a single. Ritchie tracked the wah-wah guitar on afterwards and also the guitar at the end of the middle section.

"Bird has flown" es un tema de la banda británica de hard rock Deep Purple grabado entre 1968 y 1969 al igual que "The Painter", y fue el séptimo tema del álbum Deep Purple. En 1969 cuando salieron Rod Evans y Nick Simper del grupo, la segunda alineación del grupo, con Ian Gillan y Roger Glover, la interpretó en la radio de la BBC ese mismo año.

La versión del sencillo es una versión mucho más agresiva, rápida, pesada y corta, y tiene más influencia de la música étnica de América del Norte y en lugar de wah-wah tiene Marshall Amplification para distorsionar el sonido.


DATOS DE LA GRABACIÓN

Duración: 05:32
Año: 1969
Formato: 7"
A la venta: 01/06/1969
Lado B: Hallelujah / Help
Disquera: Harvest


MÚSICOS

Rod Evans - Voz
Ritchie Blackmore - Guitarra
Nick Simper - Bajo y coros
Jon Lord - Teclados, órgano y coros
Ian Paice - Batería


ESCUCHA THE BIRD HAS FLOWN

Versión corta


LETRA

The Bird Has Flown
El pájaro ha volado
Oh the beggar on his cornerstone
Catches pity in his wrinkled hand
But the lover whose bird has flown
Catches nothing only grains of sand

All the children in the distant house
They have feelings only children know
But the lover whose bird has flown
Catches nothing only flakes of snow

The sensation is not new to you
It's something we all have known
You get it - it goes right through you
Yes it's something we all have known

And the bird it has flown
To a place on it's own
Somewhere all alone

Now the hermit in his lonely cave
Has himself to keep him company
But the lover whose bird has flown
He has heartaches same as you and me

The sensation's not new to you
It's something we all have known
You get it - it goes right through you
Yes it's something we all have known

And the bird it has flown

Now the hermit in his lonely cave
Has himself to keep him company
But the lover whose bird has flown
He has heartaches same as you and me

Oh it's started snowing



THE BIRD HAS FLOWN VIENE EN EL L.P. DEEP PURPLE III


LADO A
1. "Chasing Shadows"
2. "Blind"
3. "Lalena"
4. "Fault Line / The Painter"


LADO B
1. "Why Didn't Rosemary"
2. "Bird Has Flown"
3. "April"



Este es el tercer disco de Deep Purple, el último de la primer alineación también conocida como Mark I en la que aún estaba el vocalista Rod Evans y el bajista Nick Simper, y presumiblemente el mejor trabajo de esta Mark I. No sólo eso, sino que es uno de las mejores entregas de cualquier alineación de Deep Purple, opacada apenas por las joyas del ‘71-‘72. Este disco, también conocido por los fans como el Deep Purple III, quizá es su trabajo más psicodélico como banda, sí, más incluso que el Shades, y bastante superior, ya que no hay piezas vacías de pop, no hay malos covers (de hecho el único cover del disco es conmovedor!), no hay portadas desabridas, no hay letras vulgares, no hay piezas monótonas de rock como las que saldrían en la segunda mitad de los 70’s, y es un álbum perfectamente balanceado, con un gusto impecable, una gran variedad de estilos que van desde la delicadísima balada “Lalena” hasta tremendos blues rockers como “Why Didn't Rosemary” o “Bird Has Flown”, experimentales como “Fault Line” hasta pasajes entre clásicos-artísticos-progresivos como la inspiradísima “April”, que a pesar de su duración es una obra muy bien lograda y cuidada hasta el más mínimo detalle.

Este disco dan diverso tiene tan buenos acabados por estar hecho entre los límites de la pasión de Richie por los riffs pesados e inteligentes de guitarra (y afortunadamente aquí Blackmore tiene mucho más peso que en el Taliesyn) y por otro lado balanceado con la adoración de Jon por la música clásica que los llevó a territorios cercanos al prog. Bueno, sin contar el “Concerto For Group & Orchestra”. En este punto parece que la banda aún no se decidía por alguna de las dos corrientes que presentaban, los rockers furiosos y sanguinarios, hechos con una maestría total y con un trabajo de guitarra aún en desarrollo, pero que ya daba nota de un genio en potencia a las 6 cuerdas. Y por otro lado, un sonido más tendiente a lo clásico, a buscar suites elaboradas y detalladas con el teclado de Lord como líder, creando estructuras complejas y mezclando sonidos que recuerdan en su elaboración a Procol Harum, Pink Floyd, Jethro Tull y King Crimson. Con en In Rock está claro cual fue la corriente que prevaleció en la Deep Purple, y me parece una decisión acertada; Lord aceptó la decisión y aún así supo mantenerse como un referente básico y un tremendo tecladista, aunque siempre me ha quedado la idea de que Deep Purple también pudo haber entrado a las grandes ligas del Art-Progresive.

Pero la cuestión es que este disco no pegó no porque no fuera bueno, sino por esas cuestiones inexplicables del destino. El álbum es sólido de principio a fin, y algunos de los fans de Purple lo consideran su obra maestra por esa mezcla perfecta de psicodelia, de buenos y potentes riffs, solos creativos, y la dosis de elementos clásicos y complejidad musical proporcionados por Lord y Blackmore en un balance perfecto. Si Warner se hubiera avivado y hubiera dado apoyo y difusión al disco quién sabe si el disco hubiera sido un enorme trancazo como merecía ser, si Evans y Simper se hubieran mantenido y si el grupo hubiese seguido por terrenos del art-prog. Pero el hubiera no existe, y el hecho de que el disco haya pasado desapercibido por una broma cruel del destino no significa que no sea maravilloso ni que no lo podamos disfrutar hoy en día en toda su grandeza.

INTÉRPRETE

Deep Purple: Hertford

Deep Purple are an English rock band formed in Hertford in 1968. Along with Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath, they are considered to be among the pioneers of heavy metal and modern hard rock, although some band members believe that their music cannot be categorised as belonging to any one genre. The band incorporated classical music, blues-rock, pop and progressive rock elements. They were once listed by the Guinness Book of World Records as "the loudest pop group", and have sold over 100 million albums worldwide. Deep Purple were ranked #22 on VH1's Greatest Artists of Hard Rock programme.

The band has gone through many line-up changes and an eight-year hiatus (1976–84). The 1968–76 line-ups are commonly labelled Mark I, II, III and IV. Their second and most commercially successful line-up featured Ian Gillan (vocals), Jon Lord (keyboards), Roger Glover (bass), Ian Paice (drums) and Ritchie Blackmore (guitar). This line-up was active from 1969 to 1973 and was revived from 1984 to 1989 and again in 1993, before the rift between Blackmore and other members became unbridgeable. The current line-up (including guitarist Steve Morse) has been much more stable, although Lord's retirement in 2002 has left Paice as the only original member never to have left the band.

In October 1968, the group had success with a cover of Joe South's "Hush", which reached #4 on the US Billboard chart and #2 on the Canadian RPM charts. The song was taken from their debut album Shades of Deep Purple, which was released in July 1968, and they were booked to support Cream on their Goodbye tour.

The band's second album, The Book of Taliesyn (including a cover of Neil Diamond's "Kentucky Woman"), was released in the United States to coincide with this tour, reaching #38 on the billboard chart and #21 on the RPM charts, although it would not be released in their home country until the following year. 1969 saw the release of their third album, Deep Purple, which contained strings and woodwind on one track ("April"). Several influences were in evidence, notably Vanilla Fudge (Blackmore has even claimed the group wanted to be a "Vanilla Fudge clone") and Lord's classical antecedents such as Bach and Rimsky-Korsakov.

After these three albums and extensive touring in the United States, their American record company, Tetragrammaton, went out of business, leaving the band with no money and an uncertain future. (Tetragrammaton's assets were assumed by Warner Bros. Records, who would release Deep Purple's records in the US throughout the 1970s.) Returning to England in early 1969, they recorded a single called "Emmaretta", named for Emmaretta Marks, then a cast member of the musical Hair, whom Evans was trying to seduce. This would be the band's last recording before Evans and Simper were fired.

In search of a replacement vocalist, Blackmore set his sights on 19 year old singer Terry Reid, who only a year earlier declined a similar opportunity to front the newly forming Led Zeppelin. Though he found the offer "flattering" Reid was still bound by the exclusive recording contract with his producer Mickie Most and more interested in his solo career.[16] Blackmore had no other choice but to look elsewhere.

The band hunted down singer Ian Gillan from Episode Six, a band that had released several singles in the UK without achieving their big break for commercial success. Six's drummer Mick Underwood – an old comrade of Blackmore's from his Savages days – made the introductions of Gillan and bassist Roger Glover. This effectively killed Episode Six and gave Underwood a guilt complex that lasted nearly a decade – until Gillan recruited him for his new post-Purple band in the late 1970s.

This created the quintessential Deep Purple Mark II line-up, whose first, inauspicious release was a Greenaway-Cook tune titled "Hallelujah", which flopped.

The band gained some much-needed publicity with the Concerto for Group and Orchestra, a three-movement epic composed by Lord as a solo project and performed by the band at the Royal Albert Hall with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Malcolm Arnold. Together with Five Bridges by The Nice, it was one of the first collaborations between a rock band and an orchestra although, at the time, certain members of Deep Purple (Blackmore and Gillan especially) were less than happy at the group being tagged as "a group who played with orchestras" when actually what they had in mind was to develop the band into a much tighter, hard-rocking style. Despite this, Lord wrote and the band recorded the Gemini Suite, another orchestra/group collaboration in the same vein, in late 1970.

The Lobster - Fairport Convention


Rola: The Lobster
Traducción: La langosta
Intérprete: Fairport Convention
Compositor: George Painter, Ashley Hutchings, Richard Thompson
Disco: Fairport Convention
Productor: Joe Boyd, Tod Lloyd

DATOS DE LA GRABACIÓN

Duración: 04:49
Año: 1968
Formato: L.P.
A la venta: 01/06/1968
Disquera: Polydor


MÚSICOS

Judy Dyble - lead vocals, electric and acoustic autoharps, recorder, piano
Ian MacDonald - lead vocals, Jew's harp
Richard Thompson - vocals, lead electric and acoustic guitars, mandolin
Simon Nicol - vocals, electric 12 and 6 string and acoustic guitars
Ashley Hutchings - bass guitar, jug, double bass
Martin Lamble - Percussion, violin


ESCUCHA THE LOBSTER



LETRA

The Lobster
La langosta
Like a lobster I can swim
And can grow another limb
Where a powerless stump you saw
I have grown a powerful claw

When you'd thought me safely drowned
In the depths I swim around
Dither when you do descend
With my claw I'll tear you, friend



THE LOBSTER VIENE EN EL L.P. FAIRPORT CONVENTION


LADO A
1. "Time Will Show the Wiser"
2. "I Don't Know Where I Stand"
3. "If (Stomp)"
4. "Decameron"
5. "Jack O'Diamonds"
6. "Portfolio"


LADO B
1. "Chelsea Morning"
2. "Sun Shade"
3. "The Lobster"
4. "It's Alright Ma, It's Only Witchcraft"
5. "One Sure Thing"
6. "M1 Breakdown"


Fairport Convention is Fairport Convention's debut album. The band formed in 1967, with original line-up Judy Dyble and Ian MacDonald (later known as Iain Matthews) (vocals), Richard Thompson and Simon Nicol (guitars), Ashley “Tyger” Hutchings (bass) and Sean Frater, replaced after their first gig by Martin Lamble (percussion). In this form they made their major London stage debut in one of Brian Epstein’s Sunday concerts at the Saville Theatre.

With a rock approach strongly influenced by Jefferson Airplane's first two albums (as opposed to the traditional English folk fusion they would later become famous for), the debut album features covers of songs by Emitt Rhodes, Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Jim & Jean, and an adaptation of a poem by George Painter, as well as original material.

This is the only Fairport Convention studio album to feature Judy Dyble. She was replaced in 1968 by Sandy Denny, but during her short time with the band she managed to make a noticeable impression, particularly through her on-stage habit of knitting dishcloths and scarves when not actually singing.

The album should not be confused with the A&M Records' "Fairport Convention", the USA release/re-titling of their second UK album, What We Did On Our Holidays. The first album, listed a product of Polydor-England, was finally released in the U.S. on Cotillion Records in 1970.

INTÉRPRETE

Fairport Convention: Londres

Fairport Convention was the most famous British folk revival band, even if they were probably the less artistically skilled. They embodied the quintessence of this movement, who rarely could depart from its revival trait.

The band was formed in 1967, in the underground clubs of London, by a group of folk musicians, Richard Thompson (guitarist), Ian Matthews (singer) and Ashley Hutchings (bassist). Their first album was Fairport Convention (Polydor, 1968), a mixture of original songs and covers from American folksingers. Following the suggestions of their producer, Joe Boyd, the band recruited singer Sandy Denny (who had formerly played in the Strawbs), abandoned all Byrds’ clichés and gave preference to the writing of original songs. Denny’s Fotheringay and Thompson’s Meet On The Ledge enhanced their repertoire in What We Did On Our Holidays (Island, 1968), while Who Knows Where The Time Goes (Denny) and Genesis Hall (Thompson) where the main gems of Unhalfbricking (1970). This album also included a "progressive" arrangement of the traditional A Sailor’s Life. By her own side, Denny had one of the most peculiar voice of his era, inventing a style that will influence the following generations (for example, Kate Bush and Tori Amos). Other material (mainly covers) is included in Heyday (Hannibal, 1987 - Island, 2002).

Violinist Dave Swarbrick (a folk veteran, who had also worked with Martin Carthy) filled the gap left by Matthews’ departure. This talented group turned to play traditional songs, and produced a concept album Liege And Lief (A&M, 1970), that can be considered the British folk-rock manifesto. Modern arrangements, sharp-witted rhythms, and the duets between Swarbrick and Thompson transformed this traditional folk songs into something original and meaningful, in particular in the grand folk suites like Matty Groves and Tam Lin. Undeniably it’s a great folk album, but a poor rock album.

The band soon lost Denny and Hutchings who began independent careers (Fotheringay and Steeleye Span). So, Full House (1970) is primarily a Swarbrick’s and Thompson’s effort. This folk rock album (more folk than rock) contains the catchy Walk Awhile and the best grand folk suite of the band, Sloth, two gems of Thompson’s repertoire. In the same year, bass player Dave Pegg joined the band.

Fairport Convention es quizás la banda ícono del FolkRock Europeo, formada en Londres en mayo de 1967 se ha mantenido a través del tiempo y varios cambios en su formación hasta el día de hoy. Inicialmente la banda fue parte de la escena musical Undergroud de Londres, presentándose en salas como The Electric Garden, Middle Earth y el UFO Club, y llevaba solo algunos meses tocando cuando el visionario productor Joe Boyd les aseguró un contrato con Island Records.

Boyd les sugiere que integren a la banda un vocalista hombre que acompañase a la etérea voz de Judy Dyble, y así a fines de 1967 sacan al mercado su debut homónimo, con influencias y covers de Joni Mitchell, Bob Dylan y The Byrds. Luego de escazas ventas Judy Dyble abandona la banda y es reemplazada por Sandy Denny, ex Strawbs, quien otorgaría una voz de tono más bajo e intensa que su predecesora, y que se convertiría en uno de los elementos distintivos de la banda. Con ella sacarían al mercado los discos "What We Did On Our Holidays" y "Unhalfbricking", ambos en 1969. Con un creciente éxito comercial y un estilo musical cada vez más afiatado, la tragedia visitó a la banda cuando en Mayo de 1969, y a vuelta de un concierto en Birmingham, la van del grupo chocó en la autopista y el baterista Martin Lamble (19) y la novia del guitarrista Richard Thompson, murieron en el accidente. Se pensó en disolver la banda, pero finalmente recuperados de la desgracia volvieron al estudio para grabar el que sería su disco más aclamado: Liege And Lief, el cual se ha convertido en un ícono del FolkRock británico y convirtió a este en un género distintivo e influyente.

A pesar del triunfo de este album, Sandy Denny y Ashley Hutchings deciden dejar la banda para pasar a formar parte de Fotheringay y Steeleye Span respectivamente. Dave Pegg tomó el puesto al bajo, y la banda decidió que reemplazar a Denny sería imposible por lo que decidieron seguir solo con voces masculinas.

Así, en 1970 editan Full House, el cual es mi favorito de la banda, y uno de sus más reconocidos. Sin las voces femeninas el sonido de la banda se vuelve mas duro y de matiz rockero. Sandy Denny fue una de las voces más aclamadas del movimiento Folk inglés, en el cual la participación femenina encontró un nicho muy productivo y fue notoriamente superior que en otros movimientos musicales contemporáneos. Sin embargo personalmente encuentro que las voces femeninas del FolkRock no entregan la potencia del lado Rockero, y han pasado con mayor dificultad la barrera del tiempo.

Electrollentando - H.P. Lovecraft


Rola: Electrollentando
Intérprete: H.P. Lovecraft
Compositor: George Edwards
Disco: H.P. Lovecraft II
Productor: George Badonsky

DATOS DE LA GRABACIÓN

Duración: 06:39
Año: 1968
Formato: L.P.
A la venta: 01/09/1968
Disquera: Phillips


MÚSICOS

George Edwards – voz y guitarras acústica y eléctrica
Dave Michaels – voz y teclados
Tony Cavallari – guitarra principal y voz
Jeff Boyan – bajo y voz
Michael Tegza – batería percusión y voz


ESCUCHA ELECTROLLENTANDO



LETRA

Electrollentando

Whirling, twirling, swirling
Past the night, your door
Better than before
Not blue moon any more
Flying, flying, flying
Drifting through the room
Smelling still of you
Dreaming of the afternoon
Oh, I'm dreaming of the afternoon
Flying, flying, flying
I'm drifting through the room
Smelling still of you
I'm dreaming, dreaming of the afternoon
I'm dreaming
I'm dreaming
I'm dreaming



ELECTROLLENTANDO VIENE EN EL L.P. H.P. LOVECRAFT II


LADO A
1. "Spin, Spin, Spin"
2. "It's About Time"
3. "Blue Jack of Diamonds"
4. "Electrollentando"



LADO B
1. "At the Mountains of Madness"
2. "Mobius Trip"
3. "High Flying Bird"
4. "Nothing's Boy"
5. "Keeper of the Keys"


H. P. Lovecraft II is the second album by the American psychedelic rock band H. P. Lovecraft and was released in September 1968 on Philips Records. As with their debut LP, the album again saw the band blending psychedelic and folk rock influences, albeit with a greater emphasis on psychedelia than on their previous album release. H. P. Lovecraft II failed to sell in sufficient quantities to reach the Billboard Top LPs chart or the UK Albums Chart, despite the band being a popular act on the U.S. psychedelic concert circuit. Legend has it that the album was the first major label release to have been recorded by musicians who were all under the influence of LSD.

Recording sessions for the album began in June 1968 at I.D. Sound Studios in Los Angeles, with the band's manager George Badonsky producing and British-born Chris Huston serving as audio engineer. H. P. Lovecraft had toured intensively during the first half of 1968 and consequently, there was a lack of properly arranged new material for the album. As a result, much of H. P. Lovecraft II was improvised in the studio, with Huston playing a pivotal role in enabling the underprepared band to complete the recording sessions. In addition, Huston was also instrumental in creating the psychedelic sound effects that adorned much of the album's contents. The band's singer and guitarist, George Edwards, recalled the importance of Huston's contributions during an interview with journalist Nick Warburton: "Chris came up with a lot of very innovative techniques that prior to that record had not really been used. He was way ahead of his time. We had no material, the band was totally fried and Chris helped us make a record. That record would never have happened without Chris."

Among the tracks that were recorded for the album were the Edwards-penned compositions "Electrollentando" and "Mobius Trip", the latter of which featured lyrics that music historian Richie Unterberger has described as "disoriented hippie euphoria." In addition, the band elected to cover "Spin, Spin, Spin" and "It's About Time", both written by Terry Callier, an old friend of Edwards' from his days as a folk singer. Both songs made effective use of the oddly striking vocal interplay and close harmony singing of Edwards and the band's keyboardist Dave Michaels. The band's newest recruit, Jeff Boyan, who had only joined the group in early 1968 as a replacement for bassist Jerry McGeorge, was featured as lead vocalist on his own composition "Blue Jack of Diamonds" and on the band's cover of the folk standard "High Flying Bird". The track "Nothing's Boy" featured a contribution from voice artist Ken Nordine, and the cover version of Brewer & Shipley's "Keeper of the Keys" was issued as a single in late 1968, following its appearance on the album, but it failed to reach the charts. The self-penned "At the Mountains of Madness" was based on the 1931 novella At the Mountains of Madness by horror writer H. P. Lovecraft, after whom the band had named themselves. Written by Edwards, Michaels and lead guitarist Tony Cavallari, the song featured some chaoticly acrobatic vocal interplay and made ample use of swirling, echoed reverse tape effects, which served to highlight the song's sinister subject matter.

H. P. Lovecraft II was released in September 1968 and despite being less focused than the band's first album, it nonetheless managed to successfully expand on the musical approach of its predecessor. The album also shared the haunting, eerie ambiance of H. P. Lovecraft's first album. Although it failed to chart at the time and had gone out of print by the early 1970s, the album's reputation has grown over the years. Richie Unterberger, writing for the Allmusic website, has described it as being "much more progressive than their first effort", although he also noted that it "showed the band losing touch with some of their most obvious strengths, most notably their disciplined arrangements and incisive songwriting." By the late 1980s, a revival of interest in the band's music had begun which resulted in Edsel Records reissuing H. P. Lovecraft II and the band's debut album together on the At the Mountains of Madness compilation in 1988. The album is currently available, along with H. P. Lovecraft, on the Collectors' Choice Music CD Two Classic Albums from H. P. Lovecraft: H. P. Lovecraft/H. P. Lovecraft II. In addition, the nine songs that make up H. P. Lovecraft II are included on the Rev-Ola Records compilation Dreams in the Witch House: The Complete Philips Recordings.

INTÉRPRETE

H.P. Lovecraft: Chicago

H. P. Lovecraft was an American psychedelic rock band, formed in Chicago, Illinois in 1967 and named after horror writer H. P. Lovecraft. Much of the band's music was possessed of a haunting, eerie ambience, and consisted of material that was inspired by the macabre writings of the author whose name they had adopted. Combining elements of psychedelia and folk rock, the band's sound was marked by the striking vocal harmonies of ex-folk singer George Edwards and the classically-trained Dave Michaels. In addition, Michaels' multi-instrumentalist abilities on organ, piano, harpsichord, clarinet, and recorder provided the band with a richer sonic palette than many of their contemporaries.

The band were signed to Philips Records in 1967 and released their debut single "Anyway That You Want Me" in the early part of that year. Their debut album H. P. Lovecraft followed in late 1967 and featured what is arguably the band's best-known song, "The White Ship". The band then relocated to San Francisco, California, where they became a frequent attraction at various San Francisco Bay Area venues, including The Fillmore and the Winterland Ballroom. In 1968, a second album titled H. P. Lovecraft II appeared, but the group disbanded in early 1969. Edwards and fellow original member Michael Tegza subsequently formed a new line-up of the band with the shortened name of Lovecraft, although Edwards departed this new group before they had recorded their first album. This second incarnation of the band would release the Valley of the Moon album in 1970 and, after a further name change to Love Craft, the We Love You Whoever You Are album in 1975

It's About Time - H.P. Lovecraft


Rola: It's About Time
Traducción: Es acerca del tiempo
Intérprete: H.P. Lovecraft
Compositor: Terry Callier
Disco: H.P. Lovecraft II
Productor: George Badonsky

DATOS DE LA GRABACIÓN

Duración: 05:23
Año: 1968
Formato: L.P.
A la venta: 01/09/1968
Disquera: Phillips


MÚSICOS

George Edwards – voz y guitarras acústica y eléctrica
Dave Michaels – voz y teclados
Tony Cavallari – guitarra principal y voz
Jeff Boyan – bajo y voz
Michael Tegza – batería percusión y voz


ESCUCHA IT'S ABOUT TIME



LETRA

It's About Time
Es acerca del tiempo
Well, it's about time for the rising sun
It's about time that the deed was done
A better day's coming, that's the thing I know
You and me, brother, we can make it so

And it's about time for the wars to cease
And it's about time for the cause of peace
Because we'd better find the world when the son has grown
You and me, brother, we can overcome
We can overcome



IT'S ABOUT TIME VIENE EN EL L.P. H.P. LOVECRAFT II


LADO A
1. "Spin, Spin, Spin"
2. "It's About Time"
3. "Blue Jack of Diamonds"
4. "Electrollentando"



LADO B
1. "At the Mountains of Madness"
2. "Mobius Trip"
3. "High Flying Bird"
4. "Nothing's Boy"
5. "Keeper of the Keys"


H. P. Lovecraft II is the second album by the American psychedelic rock band H. P. Lovecraft and was released in September 1968 on Philips Records. As with their debut LP, the album again saw the band blending psychedelic and folk rock influences, albeit with a greater emphasis on psychedelia than on their previous album release. H. P. Lovecraft II failed to sell in sufficient quantities to reach the Billboard Top LPs chart or the UK Albums Chart, despite the band being a popular act on the U.S. psychedelic concert circuit. Legend has it that the album was the first major label release to have been recorded by musicians who were all under the influence of LSD.

Recording sessions for the album began in June 1968 at I.D. Sound Studios in Los Angeles, with the band's manager George Badonsky producing and British-born Chris Huston serving as audio engineer. H. P. Lovecraft had toured intensively during the first half of 1968 and consequently, there was a lack of properly arranged new material for the album. As a result, much of H. P. Lovecraft II was improvised in the studio, with Huston playing a pivotal role in enabling the underprepared band to complete the recording sessions. In addition, Huston was also instrumental in creating the psychedelic sound effects that adorned much of the album's contents. The band's singer and guitarist, George Edwards, recalled the importance of Huston's contributions during an interview with journalist Nick Warburton: "Chris came up with a lot of very innovative techniques that prior to that record had not really been used. He was way ahead of his time. We had no material, the band was totally fried and Chris helped us make a record. That record would never have happened without Chris."

Among the tracks that were recorded for the album were the Edwards-penned compositions "Electrollentando" and "Mobius Trip", the latter of which featured lyrics that music historian Richie Unterberger has described as "disoriented hippie euphoria." In addition, the band elected to cover "Spin, Spin, Spin" and "It's About Time", both written by Terry Callier, an old friend of Edwards' from his days as a folk singer. Both songs made effective use of the oddly striking vocal interplay and close harmony singing of Edwards and the band's keyboardist Dave Michaels. The band's newest recruit, Jeff Boyan, who had only joined the group in early 1968 as a replacement for bassist Jerry McGeorge, was featured as lead vocalist on his own composition "Blue Jack of Diamonds" and on the band's cover of the folk standard "High Flying Bird". The track "Nothing's Boy" featured a contribution from voice artist Ken Nordine, and the cover version of Brewer & Shipley's "Keeper of the Keys" was issued as a single in late 1968, following its appearance on the album, but it failed to reach the charts. The self-penned "At the Mountains of Madness" was based on the 1931 novella At the Mountains of Madness by horror writer H. P. Lovecraft, after whom the band had named themselves. Written by Edwards, Michaels and lead guitarist Tony Cavallari, the song featured some chaoticly acrobatic vocal interplay and made ample use of swirling, echoed reverse tape effects, which served to highlight the song's sinister subject matter.

H. P. Lovecraft II was released in September 1968 and despite being less focused than the band's first album, it nonetheless managed to successfully expand on the musical approach of its predecessor. The album also shared the haunting, eerie ambiance of H. P. Lovecraft's first album. Although it failed to chart at the time and had gone out of print by the early 1970s, the album's reputation has grown over the years. Richie Unterberger, writing for the Allmusic website, has described it as being "much more progressive than their first effort", although he also noted that it "showed the band losing touch with some of their most obvious strengths, most notably their disciplined arrangements and incisive songwriting." By the late 1980s, a revival of interest in the band's music had begun which resulted in Edsel Records reissuing H. P. Lovecraft II and the band's debut album together on the At the Mountains of Madness compilation in 1988. The album is currently available, along with H. P. Lovecraft, on the Collectors' Choice Music CD Two Classic Albums from H. P. Lovecraft: H. P. Lovecraft/H. P. Lovecraft II. In addition, the nine songs that make up H. P. Lovecraft II are included on the Rev-Ola Records compilation Dreams in the Witch House: The Complete Philips Recordings.

INTÉRPRETE

H.P. Lovecraft: Chicago

H. P. Lovecraft was an American psychedelic rock band, formed in Chicago, Illinois in 1967 and named after horror writer H. P. Lovecraft. Much of the band's music was possessed of a haunting, eerie ambience, and consisted of material that was inspired by the macabre writings of the author whose name they had adopted. Combining elements of psychedelia and folk rock, the band's sound was marked by the striking vocal harmonies of ex-folk singer George Edwards and the classically-trained Dave Michaels. In addition, Michaels' multi-instrumentalist abilities on organ, piano, harpsichord, clarinet, and recorder provided the band with a richer sonic palette than many of their contemporaries.

The band were signed to Philips Records in 1967 and released their debut single "Anyway That You Want Me" in the early part of that year. Their debut album H. P. Lovecraft followed in late 1967 and featured what is arguably the band's best-known song, "The White Ship". The band then relocated to San Francisco, California, where they became a frequent attraction at various San Francisco Bay Area venues, including The Fillmore and the Winterland Ballroom. In 1968, a second album titled H. P. Lovecraft II appeared, but the group disbanded in early 1969. Edwards and fellow original member Michael Tegza subsequently formed a new line-up of the band with the shortened name of Lovecraft, although Edwards departed this new group before they had recorded their first album. This second incarnation of the band would release the Valley of the Moon album in 1970 and, after a further name change to Love Craft, the We Love You Whoever You Are album in 1975

With You There To Help Me - Jethro Tull


Rola: With You There To Help Me
Traducción: Contigo ahí para ayudarme
Intérprete: Jethro Tull
Compositor: Ian Anderson
Disco: Benefit
Productor: Ian Anderson

HISTORIA

'With You There To Help Me' is a mind-boggling psychedelic experience, a dark, gloomy, depressing Anthem of the Optimistic Pessimist, climaxing in a 'psycho jam' replete with echoey 'flapping' synth passages, wild laughter and not any less wild guitar solos; it is actually the most energetic number on the whole record, and a memorable one at that.


DATOS DE LA GRABACIÓN

Duración: 06:19
Año: 1970
Formato: L.P.
A la venta: 20/04/1970
Disquera: Island Records


MÚSICOS

Ian Anderson - voz, guitarra y flauta
Martin Barre - guitarra eléctrica
Glenn Cornick - bajo
Clive Bunker - batería
David Palmer - arreglos orquestales
John Evan - piano y órgano


ESCUCHA WITH YOU THERE TO HELP ME



LETRA

With You There To Help Me
Contigo ahí para ayudarme
In days of peace
Sweet smelling summer nights
Of wine and song;
Dusty pavements burning feet.
Why am I crying, I want to know.
How can I smile and make it right?
For sixty days and eighty nights
And not give in and lose the fight.

I'm going back to the ones that I know,
With whom I can be what I want to be.
Just one week for the feeling to go
And with you there to help me
Then it probably will.

I won't go down
Acting the same old play.
Give sixty days for just one night.
Don't think I'd make it: but then I might.

I'm going back to the ones that I know,
With whom I can be what I want to be.
Just one week for the feeling to go
And with you there to help me
Then it probably will.

En días de paz
Dulces noches olorosas de verano
De vino y canto;
Sucios pavimentos, quemando los pies.
¿Por qué estoy llorando?, quiero saber.
¿Cómo puedo sonreír y hacer lo correcto?
Por sesenta días y ochenta noches
Y no ceder y perder la lucha.

Voy de regreso con los que conozco,
Con quienes puedo ser lo que quiero ser.
Sólo una semana para el sentimiento de ir
Y contigo ahí para ayudarme
Entonces probablemente sucederá.

No voy a caer
Actuando el juego de siempre.
Dar sesenta días por una sola noche.
No creo hacerlo, pero podría.

Voy de regreso con los que conozco,
Con quienes puedo ser lo que quiero ser.
Sólo una semana para el sentimiento de ir
Y contigo ahí para ayudarme
Entonces probablemente sucederá.


WITH YOU THERE TO HELP ME VIENE EN EL L.P. BENEFIT

VERSIÓN INGLESA

LADO A
1. "With You There To Help Me"
2. "Nothing To Say"
3. "Alive and Well and Living In"
4. "Son"
5. "For Michael Collins, Jeffrey And Me"



LADO B
1. "To Cry You A Song"
2. "A Time For Everything?"
3. "Inside"
4. "Play In Time"
5. "Sossity; You're A Woman"


VERSIÓN ESTADOUNIDENSE
**
LADO A
1. "With You There To Help Me"
2. "Nothing To Say"
3. "Inside"
4. "Son"
5. "For Michael Collins, Jeffrey And Me"



**
LADO B
1. "To Cry You A Song"
2. "A Time For Everything?"
3. "Teacher"
4. "Play In Time"
5. "Sossity; You're A Woman"


Benefit is the third album by Jethro Tull. It was released in April 1970. It was the first album to include pianist and organist John Evan (although he was not yet considered a regular member of the group), and the last to include bass guitarist Glenn Cornick. It reached #3 in the UK album charts.

The album has more hard rock than its predecessor, Stand Up. Several of the tracks make greater use of tape-manipulation techniques than the groups's earlier recordings. There is, for example, backward flute on "With You There To Help Me" and backward piano and sped up guitar on "Play In Time". There are more instances of obvious overdubbing.

INTÉRPRETE

Jethro Tull: Blackpool

Jethro Tull are a British rock group formed in 1967.[1] Their music is characterised by the lyrics, vocals and flute playing of Ian Anderson, who has led the band since its founding, and the guitar work of Martin Barre, who has been with the band since 1969.

Initially playing blues rock with an experimental flavour, they have also incorporated elements of classical music, folk music, jazz and art rock into their music.

One of the world's best-selling music artists, the band has sold more than 60 million albums worldwide in a career that has spanned more than forty years.

Ian Anderson's first band, started in 1962 in Blackpool, was known as The Blades, and featured Anderson on vocals and harmonica, Jeffrey Hammond on bass, John Evans on drums, and a guitarist named either Hipgrave or Michael Stephans. Drummer Barrie Barlow became a member in 1963 after Evans had switched from drums to piano. By 1964 the band had developed into a seven-piece Blue-eyed soul band called The John Evan Band (later The John Evan Smash).

In 1967 the band moved to the London area in search of more bookings, basing themselves in nearby Luton; they also travelled to Liverpool. However, money remained short and within days of the move most of the band quit and headed back north, leaving Anderson and bassist Glenn Cornick (who had replaced Hammond) to join forces with blues guitarist Mick Abrahams and his friend, drummer Clive Bunker, both from the Luton-based band McGregor's Engine. At first, the new band had trouble getting repeat bookings and they took to changing their name frequently to continue playing the London club circuit. Band names were often supplied by their booking agents' staff, one of whom, a history enthusiast, eventually christened them "Jethro Tull" after the 18th-century agriculturist. The name stuck because they happened to be using it the first time a club manager liked their show enough to invite them to return. They were signed to the blossoming Ellis-Wright agency, and became the third band managed by the soon-to-be Chrysalis empire. It was around this time that Anderson purchased a flute after becoming frustrated with his inability to play guitar like Eric Clapton.

Their first single was released in 1968, written by Abrahams and produced by Derek Lawrence, and called "Sunshine Day"; on the label the group's name was misspelled "Jethro Toe," making it a collector's item.[6] "Sunshine Day" was unsuccessful.

Following "This Was", Abrahams left after a falling out with Anderson and formed his own band, Blodwyn Pig. There were a number of reasons for his departure: he was a blues purist, while Anderson wanted to branch out into other forms of music; Abrahams and Cornick did not get along; and Abrahams was unwilling to travel internationally or play more than three nights a week, while the others wanted to be successful by playing as often as possible and building an international fan base.

Guitarist Tony Iommi, from the group Earth (who would soon change their name to Black Sabbath), took on guitar duties for a short time after the departure of Abrahams, appearing in The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus, in which the group (all but Ian's vocals, which were recorded live) mimed "A Song For Jeffrey" in December 1968. Iommi returned to Earth thereafter. David O'List (who had just left the Nice) also deputised on guitar with Jethro Tull for a few shows and was briefly considered as a possible permanent replacement for Abrahams, although plans of O'List becoming a full fledged member of the band never materialized

After auditions for a replacement guitarist in December 1968, Anderson chose Martin Barre, a former member of Motivation, Penny Peeps, and Gethsemane, who was playing with Noel Redding's Fat Mattress at the time. Barre was so nervous at his first audition that he could hardly play at all, and then showed up for a second audition without an amplifier or a cord to connect his guitar to another amp. Nevertheless, Barre would become Abrahams' permanent replacement on guitar and the second longest-standing member of the band after Anderson.